The Importance of Balanced Posture in Golf

By on 1st February 2016
Image of poor posture at desk

Modern lifestyles do not allow any significant and regular opportunities for developing fitness. You have to plan it into your daily routine if you are to get fitter. We spend a great deal of time sitting at work or in the car travelling to and from work or travelling to the shop, dropping children to school… the sitting goes on and on.

The consequences of prolonged sitting and poor posture during our work are weak and over stretched muscles, tendons, and ligaments, and tight, shortened muscles. Remember for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction and this relationship is very evident throughout the joints in the body when we slouch during our daily activities. The result is an imbalance in our posture with some muscles and joints remaining in a shortened or tight position while others are weakened or lengthened.

Our posture is affected by our daily habits. For example, when we sit our hip flexor muscles can become shortened or tight because we rarely go through any loosening or stretching of these muscles after they have been in a shortened position for a considerable time. The upper back muscles of many people are overstretched because of constant slouching, thus the excessive roundedness of the upper back in many people. These muscles need to be strengthened so as to reduce this roundedness. The more we slouch, the more we weaken and lengthen certain muscles. In contrast, our chest muscles and muscles surrounding our abdomen and lower rib cage can become tight and shortened. They then need to be stretched regularly so as to preserve a balance between back and front.

Why is your posture such an important consideration when playing golf?

Your posture affects your golf swing technique, power and precision. By gradually and regularly improving your posture, especially if you have some imbalances in the neck, upper back, lower back, pelvis, thighs, and in the knees and feet, you will gain several benefits. They include:

  1. A reduction in the risk of injury
  2. Greater stability in the body
  3. Greater potential in driving the ball further and more accurately

Now, here is a very important finding that we have learned over the years. Work on your swing technique and your postural imbalance exercises (stretch and strength exercises) in tandem. You just need to know what exercises to complete and how to combine them with golf swing practise or play.

To start with, you should have your posture assessed. Knowing your ‘weak’ links in posture will point you towards the exercises that are ideal for you. Too many generic programmes are just not individualised enough to guarantee success. For example, the standing lunge is a commonly prescribed exercise to strengthen the legs. However, if a golfer has tight hip flexors (the muscles in front of the hip and above the thigh) then he or she should avoid the standing lunge exercise. This is because the low back is not supported and will arch excessively if one completes a lunge. Thus if the lunge exercise is prescribed for this golfer it will be counterproductive. The standing lunge is nevertheless an excellent strengthening exercise for the individual who does not have tight hip flexors.

Also, other golfers may have a tightness in one side of their chest but not in the other. Benefits will occur in the golfer’s back swing mobility if the golfer who has a tight right chest muscle stretches and works on his/her flexibility in this area. Other golfers will have weak upper back muscles while others will have tight and shortened hamstring muscles. Thus it is critical to know your own posture needs.

Common ‘weak’ links in Posture

Here are some of the common weak links in recreational golfers:

  1. Poor upper back strength and overstretched muscles often displayed in slightly rounded shoulders and a forward neck or head
  2. Excessively arched low back with protruding abdomen – placing stress on lower back
  3. Inactive gluteals – resulting in poor base stability when addressing the ball and little power transfer during sequential rotation through to the downswing, ball impact and follow through.
  4. Poor lower and deep lying abdominal and pelvic stabilising muscles resulting in limited ability to initiate correct sequential rotation and to maintain a firm pelvic position base during the whole golf swing.

Note: You may have one, some or all of the above needs.

Read more posts by Dr. Liam Hennessy at golfperform.com/author/dr-liam-hennessy or at the Strength & Conditioning Blog http://www.thestrengthandconditioningblog.com/

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Dr Liam Hennessy

Academic Director at Setanta College
Dr. Liam Hennessy is fitness coach to three time Major winner Padraig Harrington and a member of the Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) Advisory Board. Liam is a former international athlete and world renowned S&C coach, working in top level European soccer, international rugby, and the Olympic Games. Liam is currently the Academic Director with highly regarded global sports institute - Setanta College

Latest posts by Dr Liam Hennessy (see all)

About Dr Liam Hennessy

Dr. Liam Hennessy is fitness coach to three time Major winner Padraig Harrington and a member of the Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) Advisory Board. Liam is a former international athlete and world renowned S&C coach, working in top level European soccer, international rugby, and the Olympic Games. Liam is currently the Academic Director with highly regarded global sports institute - Setanta College

2 Comments

  1. Pingback: The Importance of Balanced Posture in Golf | Go...

  2. Kerryn

    9th May 2016 at 1:23 pm

    Good to see real expertise on display. Your cotntiburion is most welcome.

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